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How many punk related genres/sub-genres are there?

Discussion in 'Music, punk scene & subcultures' started by JimMD, Jun 22, 2012.

  1. JimMD

    JimMDExperienced Member Experienced member


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    Dec 14, 2009
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    Hello all,
    I'm writing some stuff about the relationships between anarchism and punk (insider perspective as opposed to imposed academic analysis). One of the interesting things i've been thinking about is the subdivision and schism between various 'factions' within wider punk culture. The huge number of various types of punk is really pretty astounding - but i keep coming across more. How many are there? Has anyone got any suggestions? If you do have a suggestion for a sub-genre/punk related genre, can i ask that you support your claim with at least one band that fits within this category. Obviously many bands fall across several categories, and the lines between genres are very blurred indeed, but just as a point of interest, i wonder how many we can come up with?

    Cheers!

    To kick things off, here are a few from the top of my head (feel free to add bands into genres, dispute or re-categorise any you disagree with!):

    'First-wave'/'77 punk - Sex Pistols, The Damned
    New wave - The Stranglers
    Power-pop - Generation X
    Skate-punk - Pennywise
    Pop-punk - The Queers, Screeching Weasel, Teenage BottleRocket
    Ska-punk - Operation Ivy, Ex-Cathedra, Citizen Fish, Against All Authority, P.A.I.N.
    D-beat - Discharge, Oi Polloi
    UK82 - The Exploited
    Dub-punk - Autonomads
    Krust - Tragedy
    East Coast Hardcore - Agnostic Front, Sick of it All
    West Coast Hardcore - Black Flag, Circle Jerks
    Other hardcore sub-divisions? - Only Fumes and Corpses, Cut the Reins
    Straight Edge - Minor Threat, Youth of Today
    Oi! - The Business, Angelic Upstarts, Cockney Rejects, Runnin' Riot
    Folk-punk - (early) Against Me!, This Bike is a Pipe Bomb
    Anarcho-punk - Crass, Subhumans, Conflict
    Grunge? - Nirvana?
    Sludge - Slomatics
    Grindcore - Toecutter
    Street punk - The Briggs, the Casualties
    Two-tone - The Specials, the Selecter, The Beat

    What about terms like 'Real-punk', 'Brickwall-punk', 'Techno-punk'? I'm interested to see what comes up! Get stuck in.
     

  2. xhdrx

    xhdrxActive Member Forum Member


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    Jun 8, 2012
     
    Powerviolence: A raw, dissonant and even weird variant of hardcore punk. Taking cues from Grindcore, hardcore punk, noise music, jazz fusion and progressive rock. A PV song can last anything from 5 seconds to 15 minutes in one go. Some bands such as Man Is The Bastard, Iron Lung, and Endless Blockade are more influenced by noise and prog rock, while others such as Spazz, Capitalist Casualties and Dropdead play a faster and rawer variant of hardcore punk. Again, politics. Some bands would talk about funny stuff.

    Emo: started with bands such as Moss Icon, Rites of Spring and Embrace, started after the original harDCore bands decided to regroup and play in a more complex style. Whereas hardcore punk was impersonal,emo lyrics are generally self-introspective and insightful, while retaining a hardcore sound, albeit played at a more complex pace. DC bands Rites of Spring and Embrace are considered pioneers of this style with an aggressive playing style, before other bands such as Sunny Day Real Estate and Get Up Kids created a poppier style of emo.

    Skramz/Screamo: Emo's hyperactive and aggressive cousin. Conceived in the early 90's, with influences from early emo, Washington post-hardcore, British post-punk such as Bauhaus and Joy Division, and most importantly, hardcore bands Die Kreuzen and Articles of Faith, where their style of screaming is imitated by pioneering screamo bands. Some of the more technically complex bands such as Orchid, Pg.99 and In/Humanity took technical cues from the power violence scene, which was also developing in parallel at the same time. Their lyrics discuss emotional issues, politics, and an acceptance of differences of other people, and even philosophy. Note: early screamo is now called "skramz" by purists of this genre to distance themselves from the crappy bands that call themselves "screamo".

    Thrashcore: After 1984, many of the pioneering hardcore bands either broke up, or played at a slower pace. In response to this turn of events hardcore punk fans decide to play a just as,if not more aggressive form of hardcore. Bands such as Siege, Cryptic Slaughter, Septic Death and later bands such as Larm and SOB utilize blast beats in their drumming instead of the d-beat tempo. Later resurfaced in the mid 90's and still going strong today. Talks about the ills of society, the importance of scene unity,politics, and some bands such as Charles Bronson, Vitamin X, Larm and I Object talk about straight edge. Some silliness thrown in as well.

    also, I think for D-beat you're better off listing Mob 47 or Anti Cimex or Skitsystem to be on the safe side.
     
  3. xhdrx

    xhdrxActive Member Forum Member


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    Jun 8, 2012
     
    also, post punk and post hardcore in my opinion counts as well.

    Post Punk: Joy Division, Mission of Burma, Gang of Four

    Post Hardcore: At The Drive In, Drive Like Jehu, Fugazi
     
  4. @narcho-Skinhooligan

    @narcho-SkinhooliganExperienced Member Experienced member


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    Nov 25, 2011
     
    Punk is Punk, but the sub labels help somtimes...
    What about one of my personal sub-favs:
    PSYCHOBILLY!!
     
  5. JimMD

    JimMDExperienced Member Experienced member


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    Dec 14, 2009
     United Kingdom
    This is good stuff already! Cheers for those suggestions so far.

    Others that sping to mind:

    Horror punk - the Misfits
    Would punkabilly and psychobilly count separately? For psychobilly i guess we have the likes of Demented Are Go, Tiger Army, Nekromantics etc. Any bands that are punkabilly though?
    I've sometimes heard the likes of NoMeansNo described as 'Jazz punk' as well.
    Thrash punk - (later) BigWig
    Celtic-punk - Dropkick Murphys, Real Mackenzies
    No Wave?
     
  6. homegrown terror

    homegrown terrorExperienced Member Experienced member


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    Jun 13, 2012
     
    gypsy punk - gogol bordello, devotchka, blackbird raum, world/inferno friendship society
    oi-core - the bruisers, early dkm, alleged bricks
     
  7. apples&onions

    apples&onionsExperienced Member Experienced member Forum Member


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    May 16, 2012
     
    Raw blackened hardcore: Raspberry Bulbs. Skvlt, Sexdrome, Jackman, A Pregnant Light... blah blah, blah...

    Crust: Initial State, Damad, Nux Vomica, Countdown To Armageddon, Against Empire... blah, blah, blah...

    Pop Punk: The Wunder Years, Jawbreaker, The Ergs, Pinhead Gunpowder, Shorebirds, The Credentials... blah, blah, blah...

    :ecouteurs:
     
  8. xhdrx

    xhdrxActive Member Forum Member


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    Jun 8, 2012
     
    what about Queercore and Riot Grrl?

    Queercore basically talks about homosexual issues, but well, there are bands like pansy division that does it in a pop punk style or Limp Wrist which is thrashcore.

    Riot Grrl also falls under the same problem, but with an emphasis on feminism,naturally.
     
  9. homegrown terror

    homegrown terrorExperienced Member Experienced member


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    Jun 13, 2012
     
    while i fully support gender equality, i've yet to hear a riot grrl band that i could actually enjoy
     
  10. apples&onions

    apples&onionsExperienced Member Experienced member Forum Member


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    May 16, 2012
     
    [video]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G1RC9AiFIGY[/video]

    Wow, Nirvana cover, but yeah, check out TacocaT

    [video]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XXLaeZnEcHo&feature=relmfu[/video]

    I want some really radical hardcore anti civ riot grrl!
     
  11. apples&onions

    apples&onionsExperienced Member Experienced member Forum Member


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    May 16, 2012
     
    Where are their good songs? Nah, but like the majority of that set is stuff that I've never heard... It's cool though, they'd be fun to see live. Plus, they threw Volcano in there at the end, so it's all good.

    Here's some studio stuff though...
    [video]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UvgIOAu3Fa4[/video]
    [video]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DJAAEwWzETU&feature=relmfu[/video]
    [video]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PRtk52Wq1dE[/video]

    Pretty damn good.
     
  12. CrustAndSkin

    CrustAndSkinMember Forum Member


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    May 30, 2012
     
    Blackened crust like Iskra,Skitsystem,Gallhammer,Shikabane... I don't know,I listen to a lot of bands and I don't really care for their subgenres,it's all punk...

    Also grind/crust/death metal-Bolesno Grinje,Sod'n'Dan,Dislike,Mercenary Cockroach
     
  13. crustybeckham

    crustybeckhamExperienced Member Experienced member Forum Member


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    Jan 22, 2012
     
    The trouble with subgenres is that, while they may be useful to describe how a band sounds, they can also lead to even more punk cliques and to bands restricting their possible sources of inspirations. This said, when used correctly and with context in mind, subgenres can be good tools.

    While they invented the genre Discharge is not a d-beat band, it is grossly anarchonistic to claim such a thing. But Disclose, Dischange, Decontrol, Warcry, early Disfear are d-beat bands. I personally tend to distinguish stenchcore (Axegrinder, Deviated Instinct, Hellbastard, Misery...) that was heavy and metallic and slow at times from crustcore (ENT, Disrupt, Warcollapse, Doom...) that was much faster, manic and closer to Dischargey bands.

    Anarchopunk is a problematic one as well. Is it really a genre or a movement? On the one hand, I understand that the term technically has more to do with politics than with music (it can be everything between Chumba and Antisect), on the other hand, one just had to listen to the early British stuff to hear the common points between the bands (something you can actually notice with every contextualized punk wave).

    Noisepunk; distorted, fuzzy, cider-fueled punk-rock like Chaos Uk, Disorder, Confuse, State Children, but other bands like Histeria, Especimen, Imagen, Siekiera might fit too (but then Chaos UK and Disorder were huge influences on many bands so where does one start?).

    Raw punk is also used sometimes to refer to early, non-American or not influenced by US hc anyway, hardcore punk bands. In it you can file Wretched, Anti-Cimex, MG15, Siekiera, IV Reich, M68, Kaaos and well pretty much every band that had a dirty sound and played fast. I personally don't like this one very much.

    And then you can invent a subgenre everyday. Reggae crust, blackened grindcore, motorska, deathened Swedish hardcore, bollockscore. There should be some kind of decent dictionnary of these terms.
     
  14. JesusCrust

    JesusCrustExperienced Member Experienced member Forum Member


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    Apr 17, 2010
     
    Too many.
     
  15. homegrown terror

    homegrown terrorExperienced Member Experienced member


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    Jun 13, 2012
     
    we should start compiling punktionary.com or something like that...kinda in the vein of urbandictionary
     
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