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Cultural Heritage

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by persona-non-grata, Aug 25, 2011.

  1. persona-non-grata

    persona-non-grataExperienced Member Experienced member Forum Member


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    Mar 9, 2010
     
    first of all I do not want to come off as some nationalist asshole so if this topic is over the line by all means delete it

    so what my question is do the parts of the world the we now call countries keep their cultural heritage when we live in an anarchist society

    I have some examples to clarify my point here

    firstly I have an example in anarcho punk I think most of us know the band oi polloi from scotland
    scotland is a country that has a celtic heritage and oi polloi takes pride in this by using celtic imagery singing in scottish gealic and celebrating celtic holidays such as the solstice

    other examples include the love of native american culture and stuff like that

    just to be clear I am dutch and not proud of anything the former people that lived here before me have done

    so I'll just say it again I do not mean to harm anyone by this and I do not want to come off as a nationalist I just think that some cultures are just too beautiful to be lost

    so tell me what you think

    greetings

    :ecouteurs:
    nutz
     

  2. nike

    nikeExperienced Member Experienced member Forum Member


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    Jun 19, 2011
     
    i don't think that cultural diversity is endangered by anarchism - there were different cultures in europe long before any state was developed, trade goods fabricated in a distinctive style made their way from the ancient ireland across the continent to the area that we know as turkey and vice versa, the oldest legends of the europeans can still be found in modern folklore told in different versions far away from each other, giving kinda proof that they too wandered between cultural groups who changed them to fit their view, but were also told to nomads or traders who told them elsewhere.
    in the area where i live some aspects of living in a certain area are quite different to the view dominant some few kilometers away, tools and everyday objects and folkloristic clothing have their distinctive form or fabrication that was almost forgotten in "modern times", but now it's coming slowly back, maybe it has something to do with the wish to define kinda own identity above the empty slogans of nationality or some odd separatism that is typical for "bavarians" still suffering from the "prussian" lead-culture.
    anarchism is about self-determination, without a state or some organized authority like the church there is no way to force decentral communities under a greater yoke just to herd the "united" people against each other.
     
  3. anthropophagus

    anthropophagusMember Forum Member


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    Jul 31, 2011
     
    Even if there aren't discernible states, there will still be people that hold their past cultures because of their parents or knowing their history. Both my partner and I have the same cultural background and there are personality things that us and our other Ukrainian friends consider to be "things we do because we're Ukrainian", we all learned them from how our parents raised us, and how their parents raised them. Its not even a totally conscious thing; its just how we are.
    If your culture or ethnicity is important, it won't go away with the dissolution of countries. I imagine that heritage will continue in tribes, that's how they all started anyhow.
     
  4. vAsSiLy77

    vAsSiLy77Experienced Member Uploader Experienced member Forum Member


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    Jun 21, 2010
     
    Thanks to the fates you can't stop the homo ludens from fooling around with everything within reach, changing and altering it according to the actual needs - voila: the next subculture springing up to add to diversity and cultural variety and spitting authority right in the face...
     
  5. Eggs_Isle

    Eggs_IsleMember Forum Member


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    Jan 24, 2011
     
    I think the closer we get to global unity people will cease to identify with such things. Culture will always exist just the way we define it will change.
     
  6. moose

    mooseActive Member Forum Member


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    Jan 14, 2011
     
    I think that culture will continue to mold the person you are (personal values and morals) as you grow up but will have less effect on a people as a whole the closer we come to unification.
     
  7. octoistire

    octoistireActive Member Forum Member


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    Jan 17, 2011
     
    Cultural heritage can pose a problem for Anarchism when looking at it through a conservative view.

    If people understand that culture is an ever changing form and decide to be tolerant and understanding, then I don't see a problem.


    On a side note, nationalism to me, seems like people trying to fit in/meet the criteria for a fascist world.
    I suppose it does not surprise me when people see this cultural conservatism as a way to bring about peace.
     
  8. Bentheanarchist

    BentheanarchistExperienced Member Uploader Experienced member


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    Dec 10, 2010
     
    Im going to an african-american history celebration.
     
  9. zakkman666

    zakkman666Experienced Member Experienced member Forum Member


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    Sep 20, 2012
     
    I second this.
     
  10. nclpw

    nclpwExperienced Member Experienced member Forum Member


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    May 25, 2012
     
    I wasn't raised in my home country, so certain parts of our culture are important to me(literature and history mostly), but thats just me not wanting to forget where I'm from, or my native language. I can name more things I don't like about my culture than things I like about it, I think its just a matter of choosing the good things but not letting them define who you are. I don't take pride in my culture, I just enjoy it(the few things that are enjoyable).
    I don't believe any culture is threatened by or destroyed by mixing with other cultures, it just creates new ..nice things. After all, the cultures we have today are a result of emigration.
     
  11. CrustCat

    CrustCatActive Member Forum Member


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    Nov 12, 2012
     
    Not to go off topic but what did you mean by this? Non-Native Americans loving Native American culture? There are groups of people who believe imaginary of Native American culture should be abolished unless it's being worn/owned by an actual Native American individuals.
    I'm not one of those people. I'm not white so I know that no one in my family tree was involved in the Native American genocide, but I'm still NOT Native American. Yet I do own dreamcatchers, necklaces, painting, and other Native American trinkets. I admire the culture, but there are people who believe that no one except Native Americans may own such materials. Ironically almost all of those items were sold to me by a member of a tribe, so they had no problem giving me a piece of their work.
    So basically there will always be culture polices among the culture pride and culture admirers, and it's really complex. I want to know where others stand on this.
     
  12. zakkman666

    zakkman666Experienced Member Experienced member Forum Member


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    Sep 20, 2012
     
    Cultural diversity, I find is really important as long as we can all unite on the fact that we are all humans, inhabitants of planet earth.
     
  13. crustybeckham

    crustybeckhamExperienced Member Uploader Experienced member Forum Member


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    Jan 22, 2012
     
    Well, the selling-out of Native cultures is a direct result from colonization so it is hardly surprising that Native culturalists believe that traditional objects should be kept in the hands of the tribes. Non-Natives tend to love the narrative of the noble savage living in harmony with nature, a romantic idea that helps soothing the alienating aspects of "modern life". I have worked with Natives in Arizona for a year and they really took the piss out of people who claimed to be into "Native American wisdom" and appropriate certain supposedly "typical" Native clothes. But on the other hand, you also have a lot of people selling jewelry and paraphernalia in order to make a bit of money (living conditions aren't exactly ideal on the rez). I also met some Natives who wanted to keep their culture to themselves and didn't necessarily want to share it with everyone in the name of cultural diversity and that's fair enough gesture of self-protection when you consider the long history of theft and cultural colonialism. A lot of Non-Natives feel entitled to know all about Native cultures and they sometimes get upset when they are denied access to cultural knowledge.

    No hard feelings, just some thoughts. ;)
     
  14. CrustCat

    CrustCatActive Member Forum Member


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    Nov 12, 2012
     
    Yeah, I don't go around dressed up as a Native American or claim that I adopted the culture as my own. I'm just being honest about my collection and how it's a taboo.
    Like, I'm not this dude:
    [​IMG]
    We have a politician named Elizabeth Warren who claims she is Native American and now reports are surfacing that she may have been lying or that the percentage is so low that it's questionable about whether it's even accurate. Now that's fishy, and a whooooooole other issue of claiming your entitled to a culture by lying about a grandparent being 1/4 Native.
    And this isn't even limited to Native American culture. This goes for Asian, Hindi/Indian, African, Jamaican (we all have that ONE acquaintance that thinks he's a Rastafarian since he smokes weed), and everything else in between. Sometimes it's just a sincere admiration, and sometimes it's kind of awkward where someone convinces themselves they are part of that culture and next thing you know they are walking around in a headdress and attire daily.
     
  15. crustybeckham

    crustybeckhamExperienced Member Uploader Experienced member Forum Member


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    Jan 22, 2012
     
    Blood quantums is a tricky question that is always the source of arguments among Native communities. Natives are the only ethnic group which has to prove they are "real Indians" (on a more cultural level, they are also the only ones having to prove their "authenticity"). Blood quantums were imposed upon them by the government sometimes in the 50's if I remember well and it was, as usual, a means to get more land from the Indians (if you can reduce the number of "legal Indians", you can therefore buy their lands off them much more easily). Now the tribes decide what is their minimum blood quantum. The Cherokees set their quite low (1/16 I think) while the Diné's is pretty high (5/8).

    When someone who identifies as Indian has his or her identity questioned in the media, it is often a cheap shot, a dirty means to discredit him or her (and it usually works very well). There have been many examples of this. But, on the other hand, many non-Indians dream of being "real Indians" and sometimes they invent a Native ancestor (usually an Indian "princess"). Actually a quite famous actor of the 50's who used to play Indian parts all the time and claimed to be Indian himself, was in fact a Sicilian. He was born in Southern state where they hated Italians as much, if not more, as they did Indians, so passed himself off as a Native thinking it would be easier and he eventually got to Holliwood and became a star. He married a Native woman and his kids were raised in the traditional way.

    And I have actually seen people in Paris dressed like the South Park bloke. :D
     
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