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Crust Punk music?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by psychodelic, Oct 18, 2010.

  1. Veganarchy

    VeganarchyExperienced Member Experienced member Forum Member


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    Sep 10, 2009
     
    Yeah, I agree. The reason why I posted theese bands were because they had a strong influence on the creation of crustpunk, just like D-beat and anarchopunk bands had. But like wrote before, today crust is a term that covers a lot of different styles.
     
  2. jjk3546

    jjk3546Experienced Member Experienced member


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    Jan 29, 2010
     
    Crust is an excuse to get fucked up constantly, listen to metal, and not shower. I should know cause that's me. Who wants a quarter pounder with cheese and a forty?
     
  3. JesusCrust

    JesusCrustExperienced Member Experienced member Forum Member


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    Apr 17, 2010
     
    I almost want to stab you with the steak knife I haven't used it a while.

    Is crust just "punk rock" glam to you? Getting wasted and caring about people is all the jazz!
    Cheese and a 40.

    Fuck activism. Fuck getting involved in things,

    I hate how the idea of crust is underage inconsiderate apathetic hippie kids with mohawks, begging for you cash so they can drink, and not giving a fuck about anyone else...
     
  4. KAAOS-82

    KAAOS-82Experienced Member Experienced member Forum Member


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    Jul 13, 2010
     
    Crust punk is the new emo :lmao: :lmao:
    I hate you bourgeois pseudo hippies. Go home and wank over profane existence
     
  5. jjk3546

    jjk3546Experienced Member Experienced member


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    Jan 29, 2010
     
    Looks like somebody missed the joke. JesusCrust, I'm lookin' at you. Get a fuckin' sense of humor. And KAAOS 82; how is it that you know the background of everybody that you would consider crust? Some of the fuckin' people on this site...
     
  6. JesusCrust

    JesusCrustExperienced Member Experienced member Forum Member


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    Apr 17, 2010
     
    Sorry, I was a little drunk last night when I wrote that. That's a little ironic eh?
     
  7. jjk3546

    jjk3546Experienced Member Experienced member


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    Jan 29, 2010
     
    Ha. Right on. As long as ya weren't eating a quarter pounder with cheese too... :D
     
  8. JesusCrust

    JesusCrustExperienced Member Experienced member Forum Member


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    Apr 17, 2010
     
    I think i'd puke if I did ^^
     
  9. KAAOS-82

    KAAOS-82Experienced Member Experienced member Forum Member


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    Jul 13, 2010
     
    Why would anyone want to listen to hippies playing death metal........ blaahhhhh
     
  10. Rabbit

    RabbitExperienced Member Experienced member Forum Member


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    Oct 26, 2009
     
    My problem with them getting lumped in with current crust is that bands like those are the main inspiration for the music I play, which sure as shit isn't crust, and a lot of people resent raw punk getting thrown in with modern crust, which is for me a pretty mixed bag.
     
  11. Veganarchy

    VeganarchyExperienced Member Experienced member Forum Member


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    Sep 10, 2009
     
    See your point, but he didn't just asked for crustbands, but also for some more information about the crust genrer. So I thought it would make sense to throw in some early bands that influenced the style. I wouldn't call the bands you mentionted crust either, coz it is rawpunk/käng. But I also wouldn't call bands like Aus-rotten, Contravene and Detestation Crust. I think there is a lot of "mordern" anarcho/HC punkbands that are much influenced by crust, rawpunk and D-beat (and vice versa), so it can be pretty hard sometimes to come up with a genrer-label that fits 100%.
     
  12. seitan

    seitanExperienced Member Experienced member Forum Member


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    Nov 7, 2009
     
    the meat and dairy industry isnt apart of capitalism.


    or is it?
     
  13. Rabbit

    RabbitExperienced Member Experienced member Forum Member


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    Oct 26, 2009
     
    Yet meat and dairy would still be consumed in a non-capitalist system, so I don't see what point you're trying to make.
     
  14. Corporate Deathburger

    Corporate DeathburgerExperienced Member Experienced member Forum Member


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    Sep 29, 2010
     
    Dystopia? \m/
     
  15. seitan

    seitanExperienced Member Experienced member Forum Member


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    Nov 7, 2009
     
    is this non capitalist system an "anarchist" system? anarchists shouldnt be eating meat.
     
  16. Anxiety69

    Anxiety69Experienced Member Experienced member Forum Member


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    Oct 18, 2009
     

    You are kidding right? The meat industry, all the fast food companies and supermarket chains etc. aren't corporate? The dairy industry as well? That is one of the dumbest statements i've read on this site, and there have been some doozies.
     
  17. KAAOS-82

    KAAOS-82Experienced Member Experienced member Forum Member


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    Jul 13, 2010
     
    eat a juicy steak and harden up!

    [​IMG]
     
  18. Derek Danger

    Derek DangerExperienced Member Experienced member Forum Member


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    Jan 29, 2010
     
    Hahahaha, vego-trolling bastard. Love it!
     
  19. New Face In Hell

    New Face In HellExperienced Member Experienced member Forum Member


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    Jan 22, 2010
     
  20. DrunkSquid

    DrunkSquidExperienced Member Experienced member Forum Member


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    Oct 11, 2009
     
    [​IMG]

    Crust (geology)
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


    Geologic provinces of the world (USGS)
    Shield
    Platform
    Orogen
    Basin
    Large igneous province
    Extended crust
    Oceanic crust:
    0–20 Ma
    20–65 Ma
    >65 Ma
    In geology, a crust is the outermost solid shell of a rocky planet or moon, which is chemically distinct from the underlying mantle. The crusts of Earth, our Moon, Mercury, Venus, Mars, Io, and other planetary bodies have been generated largely by igneous processes, and these crusts are richer in incompatible elements than their respective mantles.
    Contents [hide]
    1 Earth's crust
    1.1 Composition of the continental crust
    2 Moon's crust
    3 References
    4 See also
    5 External links
    [edit]Earth's crust



    Earth cutaway from core to exosphere.
    The crust of the Earth is composed of a great variety of igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks. The crust is underlain by the mantle. The upper part of the mantle is composed mostly of peridotite, a rock denser than rocks common in the overlying crust. The boundary between the crust and mantle is conventionally placed at the Mohorovičić discontinuity, a boundary defined by a contrast in seismic velocity. Earth's crust occupies less than 1% of Earth's volume.
    The oceanic crust of the sheet is different from its continental crust. The oceanic crust is 5 km (3 mi) to 10 km (6 mi) thick[1] and is composed primarily of basalt, diabase, and gabbro. The continental crust is typically from 30 km (20 mi) to 50 km (30 mi) thick, and is mostly composed of slightly less dense rocks than those of the oceanic crust. Some of these less dense rocks, such as granite, are common in the continental crust but rare to absent in the oceanic crust. Both the continental and oceanic crust "float" on the mantle. Because the continental crust is thicker, it extends both above and below the oceanic crust, much like a large iceberg floating next to smaller one. (The slightly lighter density of felsic continental rock compared to basaltic ocean rock also contributes to the higher relative elevation of the top of the continental crust.) Because the top of the continental crust is above that of the oceanic, water runs off the continents and collects above the oceanic crust. The continental crust and the oceanic crust are sometimes called sial and sima respectively. Due to the change in velocity of seismic waves it is believed that on continents at a certain depth sial becomes close in its physical properties to sima and the dividing line is called Conrad discontinuity.
    The temperature of the crust increases with depth, reaching values typically in the range from about 200°C (392°F) to 400°C (752°F) at the boundary with the underlying mantle. The crust and underlying relatively rigid mantle make up the lithosphere. Because of convection in the underlying plastic (although non-molten) upper mantle and asthenosphere, the lithosphere is broken into tectonic plates that move. The temperature increases by as much as 30°C (about 50°F) for every kilometer locally in the upper part of the crust, but the geothermal gradient is smaller in deeper crust.[2]


    Plates in the crust of the earth, according to the plate tectonics theory

    Partly by analogy to what is known about our Moon, Earth is considered to have differentiated from an aggregate of planetesimals into its core, mantle and crust within about 100 million years of the formation of the planet, 4.6 billion years ago. The primordial crust was very thin, and was probably recycled by much more vigorous plate tectonics and destroyed by significant asteroid impacts, which were much more common in the early stages of the solar system.
    The Earth has probably always had some form of basaltic crust, but the age of the oldest oceanic crust today is only about 200 million years. In contrast, the bulk of the continental crust is much older. The oldest continental crustal rocks on Earth have ages in the range from about 3.7 to 4.28 billion years [3][4] and have been found in the Narryer Gneiss Terrane in Western Australia, in the Acasta Gneiss in the Northwest Territories on the Canadian Shield, and on other cratonic regions such as those on the Fennoscandian Shield. A few zircons with ages as great as 4.3 billion years have been found in the Narryer Gneiss Terrane.
    The average age of the current Earth's continental crust has been estimated to be about 2.0 billion years.[5] Most crustal rocks formed before 2.5 billion years ago are located in cratons. Such old continental crust and the underlying mantle asthenosphere are less dense than elsewhere in the earth and so are not readily destroyed by subduction. Formation of new continental crust is linked to periods of intense orogeny or mountain building; these periods coincide with the formation of the supercontinents such as Rodinia, Pangaea and Gondwana. The crust forms in part by aggregation of island arcs including granite and metamorphic fold belts, and it is preserved in part by depletion of the underlying mantle to form buoyant lithospheric mantle.
    [edit]Composition of the continental crust
    Main article: Abundance of elements in Earth's crust


    Abundance (atom fraction) of the chemical elements in Earth's upper continental crust as a function of atomic number.
    This table shows the abundance of elements in Earth's crust. Numbers show percentage in mass. The continental crust has an average composition similar to that of the igneous rock, andesite. The composition tabulated below and the following discussion are based largely on the summary by Rudnick and Gao (2003).[6] Continental crust is enriched in incompatible elements compared to the basaltic ocean crust and much enriched compared to the underlying mantle. Although the continental crust comprises only about 0.6 weight percent of the silicate Earth, it contains 20% to 70% of the incompatible elements.
    Oxide Percent
    SiO2 60.6
    Al2O3 15.9
    CaO 6.4
    MgO 4.7
    Na2O 3.1
    Fe as FeO 6.7
    K2O 1.8
    TiO2 0.7
    P2O5 0.1
    All the other constituents except water occur only in very small quantities, and total less than 1%. Estimates of average density for the upper crust range between 2.69 g/cm3 and 2.74 g/cm3 and for lower crust between 3.0 g/cm3 and 3.25 g/cm3[7].
    A more detailed and comprehensive list of elemental composition for the upper crust is given in the main article abundance of elements in Earth's crust.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
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