Loading...
Welcome to Anarcho-Punk.net community ! Please register or login to participate in the forums.   Ⓐ//Ⓔ

Australian Government Internet Filter

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by nodz, May 15, 2010.

  1. nodz

    nodzExperienced Member Experienced member Forum Member


    328

    0

    5

    Apr 4, 2010
     
    There is a lot on the news here at the moment regarding the Australian Government's Mandatory Internet Filtering policy. I don't agree with censorship but I do agree with the prevention of exploitation of children, women and the distribution of hateful or discriminatory or racially inciteful information. I went serching for what has been implemented and what is proposed and came across this site, http://libertus.net/censor/isp-blocking ... .html#s_19
    What I find scary is that the 'blacklist' that is mentioned is maintained by the ACMA and sites can just be added to the blacklist by their discretion. Sites like those that distribute or promote anarchist/anti-government/anti-establishment sentiment could be added at their discretion if deemed inappropriate for adult viewing.
     

  2. rude-boy

    rude-boyExperienced Member Experienced member Forum Member


    432

    0

    0

    Mar 12, 2010
     
    its not new for crazy censorships and shit liek that going on down under. isent there hardcore laws against video games and movies with to much violance
     
  3. nodz

    nodzExperienced Member Experienced member Forum Member


    328

    0

    5

    Apr 4, 2010
     
    Yeah video games that have a lot violence are given high classifications. From memory, there was some hoohar over grand theft auto 4 when it was released
     
  4. ungovernable

    ungovernableAutonome Staff Member Uploader Admin Team Experienced member


    4,338

    70

    24

    Aug 21, 2009
    Male, 34 years old
    Canada United States
    a list of 1300 censored website was released almost 1 year ago, and it was very shocking to see that only a little percentage of those website were pedaphiles.

    some pro-abortion websites were censored, some commercial websites selling elevators were also censored, even some porn websites that had nothing to do with pedaphiles were censored. They even censored some online poker websites!!

    you can't support this bullshit. the list of the censored websites is also private, so you can't really know what is censored. In thailand they started a similar censorship to block the pedophiles websites but then surprise, one year later over 1500 websites were censored for critizing the royal family.

    If you give the right to government to censor the internet, they will obviously abuse it and the censorship will take bigger proportions as the time goes
     
  5. ungovernable

    ungovernableAutonome Staff Member Uploader Admin Team Experienced member


    4,338

    70

    24

    Aug 21, 2009
    Male, 34 years old
    Canada United States
    1 year ago...... now just immagine how it got worse




    By Ezra Levant | Publication Date: May 2009
    How would censorship work in the Internet age? Australia gives us a sneak preview of the gong show that ensues when medieval thinking is applied to a wired world.



    Australia’s government nannies have officially banned 1,370 web sites. They’ve drawn up a blacklist, just like the medieval index of banned books. Right now it’s a voluntary pilot project to which Internet service providers can submit. But if the trial run is deemed a success and made law, anyone who links to a blacklisted site can be fined $11,000 a day. That means it will be a crime not just to provide the contents of a web site, but to merely reproduce its address.



    That’s not just like banning books. It’s like banning books, and banning saying the banned book’s title. It’s a lot of banning.



    But here’s the tricky part: the government won’t even say what those 1,370 banned web sites are. It’s secret. So there are 1,370 web sites out there that could result in your criminal prosecution in Australia. But you won’t find out what they are — until you link to one of them. That’s right out of Alice in Wonderland. The pretzelian logic goes like this: if the Australian government were to list those 1,370 banned web sites, then not only would they be breaking the rules themselves, but that list would serve as an advertisement. Out of the billions of web pages on the Internet, 1,370 would be given special attention, inviting anyone curious to check them out.



    Of course, people who compile the secret blacklist know what’s on it. But apparently they can be trusted not to succumb to the temptation to look at the sites. And the list was sent to selected Australian Internet companies for a trial run. That didn’t work out quite as well. The list was leaked to Wikileaks, the web site that specializes in publishing confidential documents, especially embarrassing internal government memoranda.



    And that’s when things got even weirder. Wikileaks published the entire blacklist on one of its pages. So now that Wikileaks page, too, has been added to the blacklist. It’s number 1,371.



    Needless to say, I was tempted to skim the names of the banned sites. Most of them are porn sites, and some have names that suggest child pornography, which is a crime. But that’s what we have courts for. The Australian blacklist wasn’t written by a court; there was no hearing where evidence was brought that these sites were criminal sites. A group of busybody human rights activists simply wrote the blacklist. Sounds Canadian, actually.



    Many banned sites are merely offensive, but not illegal. And some sites are perfectly innocuous. For some secret reason, the web site www.vanbokhorst.nl is on the blacklist. If you’re not in Australia, feel free to give that one a click. It’s not a pornographic site. My Dutch is rusty, but it appears to be a web site for a forklift rental company in Holland.



    How did Van Bokhorst get on the blacklist in Australia? Nobody knows because the process was kept secret, even from Van Bokhorst. It’s unlikely that Van Bokhorst had any Australian customers. But that’s not the point. Someone is making these clandestine decisions about what Australians can or can’t see.



    We’ve seen this sort of censorship in other countries — and not just from the likes of communist China. Thailand brought in a similar blacklist in the name of protecting its citizens from child pornography. But — surprise! — within months, the blacklist had other web sites on it, including 1,200 banned for criticizing the Thai royal family. A secret list, in the hands of a government, practically guarantees that sort of political abuse.



    Australia’s trial-run blacklist has plenty of questionable items on it, and not just Dutch forklift companies. Hundreds of Internet poker sites are banned. Poker, unlike child pornography, is not a crime. It may be a vice, but how to handle that is a political debate. Australia’s blacklist ends that discussion with force.



    And now a web site about abortion politics is on the blacklist. You can probably guess which side of the debate is being censored, but either way, it’s abominable censorship.



    That blacklist was sold as a way to stop child porn. But that’s the thing about slippery slopes, isn’t it; you don’t really see the dangers until you’ve started sliding into them.



    The Canadian Human Rights Commission wants an Internet blacklist, too. It wants to expand Canada’s cybertip.ca to cover political sites, not just child porn sites it targets now.



    We associate book burnings with witch trials and the Nazis, not with mild-mannered bureaucrats. But book burnings in the 21st century require no matches — just self-righteous censors and a somnolent public.



    Ezra Levant is a Calgary lawyer and author. He can be reached at [email protected]
     
  6. nodz

    nodzExperienced Member Experienced member Forum Member


    328

    0

    5

    Apr 4, 2010
     
    I don't support the censorship. I want prevention of exploitation of children and the like.

    You said it more eloquently than me, this is what I meant when I said that the sites like anti-establishment, anti-government and anarcho sites could be added to the list by the discretion of the AMCA if deemed inappropriate.
     
  7. Bunny

    BunnyExperienced Member Experienced member Forum Member


    201

    0

    1

    Mar 13, 2010
     
    I hope they don't. I'd hate to lose you and all the other Aussies {pleure}
     
  8. Anxiety69

    Anxiety69Experienced Member Uploader Experienced member Forum Member


    2,341

    6

    156

    Oct 18, 2009
    Male, 43 years old
    Long Beach CA United States
    i just read that in australia, video games which in the states would get the M rated are not allowed to be sold period, not even to adults. what a bunch of bullshit.
     
  9. ungovernable

    ungovernableAutonome Staff Member Uploader Admin Team Experienced member


    4,338

    70

    24

    Aug 21, 2009
    Male, 34 years old
    Canada United States
    wow i didn't know that... it's really stupid
     
  10. Probe

    ProbeExperienced Member Uploader Experienced member Forum Member


    690

    1

    57

    Jan 30, 2010
     
    Yea I've read about this shit...isnt this a violation of Free Speech?
     
  11. Anxiety69

    Anxiety69Experienced Member Uploader Experienced member Forum Member


    2,341

    6

    156

    Oct 18, 2009
    Male, 43 years old
    Long Beach CA United States
    free speech? more like freedom of adults to make their own decisions without government putting their hands down our pants.
     
  12. Valsira

    ValsiraExperienced Member Experienced member


    73

    0

    0

    Dec 14, 2009
     
    Australia does have an M rating, what they don't have is an R18 rating. So, any game that would be sold as R18 elsewhere will be refused classification (the most recent was Left 4 Dead 2), although games which would be sold as R16 here usually get through on the MA15+ rating. Yeah, it's fucking stupid. They had a public consulation on the issue recently and 98% of submissions were in favour of introducing an R18 rating, but the Federal Home Affairs department still seem reluctant to change anything.
     
  13. Anxiety69

    Anxiety69Experienced Member Uploader Experienced member Forum Member


    2,341

    6

    156

    Oct 18, 2009
    Male, 43 years old
    Long Beach CA United States
    In the states we don;t have R18, we just Have M which is basically you must be 18 or older to play period , of course there are no laws here enforcing ratings systems, most stores that do so do it by their own personal choice, and Governator Arnie is trying to make it a law here in california that minors can't buy M rated games, and it is going to be the first time a video game case is herd by the supreme court. Too bad parents dont seem to be allowed to use their own parental sense to whether kids can play games or not. Hell, there is no actual law about children under 17 being ale to see an R rated movie (again most theater chains enforce it themselves by their choice) though there is for NC-17 and X rated films. The whole thing is a total joke, both in Australia and the USA.
     
  14. nodz

    nodzExperienced Member Experienced member Forum Member


    328

    0

    5

    Apr 4, 2010
     
    I would assume there are laws relating to enforcement of ratings here in Australia. While it is unlikely that anyone has been charged in relation to the enforcement of a rating if fourteen years olds were allowed to see an X rated movie I'm sure the cinema that allowed addmittance would be charged ,warned, disciplined, fined etc.
     
  15. Valsira

    ValsiraExperienced Member Experienced member


    73

    0

    0

    Dec 14, 2009
     
    Oh, really? Didn't know that. M here means 'we would prefer it if you were 16 or over but we're not gonna stop you'. Hm.
     
  16. Lunadimae

    LunadimaeExperienced Member Experienced member Forum Member


    229

    0

    1

    Mar 1, 2010
     
    Shit, that's pretty bad, hope it doesn't turn out like China. The government will get to choose whatever they want their citizens to see, trying to create the perfect citizen.


    And Fallout 3 was going to get banned from Australia because it had drug references, so Bethesda (Fallout 3 devs/publishers) changed the drug names from Morphine etc... to Med-X.

    I think Cheap Sex's I've Been Raped By The FCC says it right.
     
  17. Probe

    ProbeExperienced Member Uploader Experienced member Forum Member


    690

    1

    57

    Jan 30, 2010
     
    wait..if this act passes, would that mean that this site gets blocked in Australia?
     
  18. Lunadimae

    LunadimaeExperienced Member Experienced member Forum Member


    229

    0

    1

    Mar 1, 2010
     
    They didn't release the list of blocked sites, so we don't know at the moment.
     
  19. nodz

    nodzExperienced Member Experienced member Forum Member


    328

    0

    5

    Apr 4, 2010
     
    Yes the list is 'private' so you don't know if you are breaking the law by accessing the site
     
  20. QueerPunk

    QueerPunkExperienced Member Experienced member Forum Member


    430

    3

    0

    Dec 29, 2009
     
    There are ways around the proposed filter.

    Saw on one of the news programs we have here (4 Corners) that there are heaps of old people (like 70+) learning to get around the filter so they can access the euthenasia advice stuff like how to kill yourself peacefully in case of terminal disease and the such.
     
Loading...