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Anarchosyndicalism and IWA`s XXV Congress

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Bakica, Jan 20, 2014.

  1. Bakica

    BakicaExperienced Member Experienced member Forum Member


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    Feb 21, 2010
     
    A bit old news, but still gives us space for discussion about modern anarchosyndicalism, it's impact on the movement and differences between syndicalism and insurrectionism.


    IWA site

    I have .pdf report of point that were approved / not approved and some main decisions that were made there, if anyone is interested feel free to PM me.

    I think that we can all agree that anarchosyndicalisms golden age finished long time ago, and what we see today is remains of old unions ( CNT, CNT-F, CNTE, CGT and so on) trying to be as radical as possible ( as part of IWA ). What we miss is critical mass, groups of people ( workers ) who can achive revolution ( not necessarily global, but local - on work places ). This is where insurrectionism comes into game, and as Bonano puts it : 'It's easy. You can do it by yourself, or with a bunch of trusted comrades. You don't need to have great means or technical competence. The capital is vulnerable, if you are determined to act'.

    I am part of anarchosyndicalist movement in my region, although I think it is currently not the most efficient way of fighting back. I think that violent direct action followed by strike / general strikes is the only way to bring change ( this is also debatable, because change is irrelevant if it's not the capitalist system being changed from roots, meaning higher slave-wages don't mean much if you're still being exploited on daily basis ). That's just my 2 cents.
     

  2. IronBENGA

    IronBENGAActive Member Forum Member


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    Jan 13, 2014
     
    You touched on a great point that is the lack of critical mass on the IWA-unions. The fact is - at least for Brazil's situation - the working class today has accomodated to its condition as the regular unions got more and more space into the governmental politics. As long as the money is coming in, no one will complain. And the money is indeed coming, but without the social benefits associated to it, but no one cares. And, if the crisis hits, the fear of radicalism may push workers torwards the legal means - which is negotiation tables, regular strikes - before revolutionaly actions.

    My point is: Without the necessary numbers to endorse the actions or a really dire economic and social crisis that put anarchy as the only way, workers wont take anarchosyndicalism as an option and won't support our actions. Let's face it: even if we are on the 21-frikkin-century, people still thinks anarchy is equal to chaos and they were all conditioned to avoid "chaos" in pursuit of the "order" provided by the capitalist way of life. The regular unions softened up or are conspiring with the governments for their own profit at the expense of the workers, but the general public doesnt know that because, as a minority, its easy for the governments put the blame of all the world's problems on us and on our methods to scare people away. So, if we strike now with more and more violence, it will be easier for us to be demonized and defeated by the governments and the public opinion.

    instead of optimizing our ways of fighting back with lesser people, we need to bring people in. Not that we will abandon the radical ways course of action, but we need first to lend a friendly hand to the workers and show that anarchy IS a viable way. We need to show them that violent direct action isnt our only way of protest, because people are generally afraid of violence. Instead, we can rely also on other means of resistance, such as occupation of companies, general strikes, cultural sabotage, solidarity networks that provide shelter and food to those who are more in need.

    In short, instead of just trying to hit on the weak spots of capitalism by ourselves, we need to show people that there is an alternative to capitalism, so that people will help us to do it.

    Just to keep clear, thats my opinion. im more than curious to see yours
     
  3. Bakica

    BakicaExperienced Member Experienced member Forum Member


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    Feb 21, 2010
     
    I don't think that's only Brazils problem, it's a problem generally connected with unions. Lack of radicalism and reformism are two main problems with modern syndicalism. I've never heard a union saying that 8 hour day is too long, or that capitalism is truly the root of all evil. Reformist unions are getting more attention than anarhist / radical / revolutionary unions, and that is the reason why anarchosyndicalism is doomed to blend in reformist movement and become one of many pointless unions.

    Well, what's the solution to this problem ? Education of working class ? Lets face it, we haven't seen a revolution since 1991. We had over 20 years to educate and organize working class movement, and we failed in every aspect ( in Croatia, there are more people supporting radical communist unions / parties than anarhist / revolutionary ). It's not 1936 anymore, we're not able to take over cities in few days. So, new year has begun and do we have solution to this problem ? How to make this movement alert, active and not inert ? I fail to see revolutionary syndicalism working on a bigger scale in 21st century. We're trying to adjust to modern age in a wrong way which inevitably leads to reformist movement

    Insurrectionism, on the other hand, is very direct and efficient in achieving goals but fails to organize masses ( but syndicalism is failing at this as well ) since it's a movement based on small affinity groups . As I've already said before, I think that small, violent direct actions can ( but don't have to ) contribute to waking up the people ( propaganda of the deed ).

    Ah, there so much I want to say but it's just too fucking late for me to write. I'd like to hear more opinions on this topic. I'll write again when I feel better.
     
  4. IronBENGA

    IronBENGAActive Member Forum Member


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    Jan 13, 2014
     
    Im not saying that insurrectionism is wrong, but im saying that we need to work on both sides - fighting the behemoth of capitalism AND showing the working class that they can do it too. I know we failed to educate and organize the workers, but we still need to try. Violent direct action is indeed a great tool, but it's not the only one.

    Shit how awersome would it be if we coud discuss this face-to-face, along with other friends and beer