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'77 punk

Discussion in 'Music, punk scene & subcultures' started by punkdude, Sep 3, 2009.

  1. punkdude

    punkdudeMember New Member


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    Aug 27, 2009
     
    what do you guys think about '77 punk??

    Sex pistols, ramones, the clash, sid vicious, ...
     

  2. AndersB

    AndersBActive Member Forum Member


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    Aug 27, 2009
     
    I think it's great. It's always a good idea to check out what it all started with. They may not be to everyones liking, but they were pioneers in their own sense.
     
  3. ungovernable

    ungovernableAutonome Staff Member Admin Team Experienced member


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    Sex pistols: Sellouts
    Ramones: Sellouts
    The Clash: Sellouts
    Sid Vicious: A dumbass and a sellout. (never understood why so many co-called punks worship him like he was a hero). On top of all, he couldn't even play bass (he was playing like shit)

    REAL punk started with bands like crass, conflict, flux of pink indians, ...
     
  4. ghost in the void

    ghost in the voidExperienced Member Experienced member Forum Member


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    Aug 8, 2009
     
    what a curious thing to write. most historians generally agree that punk started with MC5 and THE STOOGES when refering to the modern punk "sound". a lot of people also believe that punk started in the 60s, not the late 70s. furthermore, the use of the word "punk" dates back to the inquisition, and has the same social implications as the word "faggot". faggot meaning fallen wood in forests, punk being the fungi that grew on such wood. this wood was used to burn heretics.

    the word punk is generally used to describe outsiders to the mainstream, and as such, is very old. the culture of punk didn't start in the 1970s or the 1960s, but several centuries beforehand. i am really very suprised at how few people realise this.
     
  5. Spider

    SpiderExperienced Member Experienced member


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    Sep 3, 2009
     
    in terms of the punk of that era, i always liked the saints more than the pistols. I felt like the pistols were always putting forward what they percieved to be a punk persona, (ie "I am an Anarchist" hey so am i lets get behind this band sorta thing) i get a much stronger feeling of legitimacy and honesty from the saints. I suppose from a postmodern perspective where everything is derivative you could say that whilst these bands may not have been completely sincere with their percieved persona (see "Gangsta Rap") the bands that they helped to inspire took the ideologies and DIY ethics which they had glamourised, and put them into effect.

    Vive le punx
     
  6. bulavka

    bulavkaActive Member Forum Member


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    Sep 1, 2009
     
    Yes.
    earlier, a few years ago, I thought that the sex pistols - a real punk. in our country they are very popular among false punks. They are popular because the media made them so. and they are immoral. because of this group in our country punks - young people who are not interested in anything but a lot of drink, smoke, behave immorally, listen to bad commercial music with silly lyrics, and some of them are fascists. Sid - is a bad example for punk rock. and he did nothing to punk, to music, unlike other groups, such as Crass.


    but, I like The clash. and like film about Joe Str.



    I like punk 77 and respect the many groups, but I'm listening this music is not very often
     
  7. ungovernable

    ungovernableAutonome Staff Member Admin Team Experienced member


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    The only song i like from The Clash is "Guns of brixtons", but Inner terresterials or Bolchoi cover is way better....

    But oh well, The Clash is comparable to Sex Pistols... Anarcho bands hated them equally... Just read the lyrics of "punk is dead" by Crass ;)

    Worst thing is that sometimes i see punks who thinks the Sex Pistols are real anarchists just because they sing "anarchy in the UK"....
     
  8. ghost in the void

    ghost in the voidExperienced Member Experienced member Forum Member


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    Aug 8, 2009
     
    the funny thing is the 'PISTOLS actually inspired CRASS, because they wanted to take the play-acting and make it real. i actually don't mind SEX PISTOLS or THE CLASH at all, i just consider them major label rock bands rather than punk per se. THE EXPLOITED however are rubbish, because they actually believe they're a punk band and don't have the sense of irony of the other two. the SEX PISTOLS are actually more like an invented "boy band" like THE MONKEES before them, and NEW KIDS ON THE BLOCK and N-SYNC etc that followed. call him what you want, but their manager malcolm mclaren was very clever at marketing, and so was his partner vivian westwood, her brand now of course a major player in the fashion scene.
     
  9. sociopop82

    sociopop82Experienced Member Experienced member


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    Sep 3, 2009
     
    i had my fun with it but 77 was a long time ago.
    it's irrelevant to me.
    the saints are great by the way
    so are some older garage bands. namely
    the sonics.
     
  10. professerslime

    professerslimeMember New Member


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    Sep 6, 2009
     
    I also believe that "punk" predated Sex Pistols and the Ramones. Not just as a definition meaning outsider or a rebel. It also existed in late 60's bands that the corporations wouldn't touch because they were to radical or just unmarketable. Ever since they came up with the term latch key kid after WWII there has been a wild anti-authoritarian element to our social conscience. A lot of the mythology was inflated by all those exploitation films that came out in the 50's and the 60's. Fuking Hollywood. But in conclusion there always has been rebellion and dissent only now there is a music and a label attached to it.
     
  11. Fredzilla

    FredzillaNew Member New Member


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    Sep 5, 2009
     
    I agree with the sex pistol things , but who are we to decide and believe what is real or what is fake ??? If someone is happy to be '' IS '' way , why not ???? I know it's bad for the scene and doesn't bring any good to the serious ''follower'' . But stil , beeing a '' PUNK ROCKER '' doesn't mean liberty of expression ???!!!??? The word '' POSEUR '' only apply to those who are deciding that you are a '' POSEUR '' , somewhere inside them , they are jealous of something ! About what ? I don't know , but they sure are jealous , they won't admit it but anyway it's how the human was made and it's how he keep growing the mentality ..... who's ever eard the sentence : live and let die .........So cheers and have a good life (don't worry i hate the human race more than i hate cockroachs or bed bugs...)
     
  12. mel_the_bell

    mel_the_bellExperienced Member Experienced member


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    Aug 30, 2009
     
    well the first punk record i ever got was a sex pistols single so i cant say they never influenced me or i never listened to em :p

    also 70s punks great for say a jukebox in a pub............bound to find the adverts, or sex pistols or slf on it...but NOT crass, flux or rudimentary peni lol
     
  13. NGNM85

    NGNM85Experienced Member Experienced member Forum Member


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    Sep 8, 2009
     
    If the Pistols "sold out", which is debateable, it wasn't until the 1996 reunion, they didn't make any significant amount of money between the forming of the band, and the breakup in '79.

    Umm, I might mention that the Clash forfeited potential earnings to keep the album prices low, they also wanted to be remembered for their political songs, not the poppier songs, many of which they wanted to be released as B-sides. I'd also question your definition of "sellout."

    Since when does musicianship matter? Although, Glen was much better for the band,.

    Negative. Thats' when ANARCHIST punk started. Punk is NOT Anarchist and Anarchism is not necessarily "punk." They have similar tendencies and commonalities but thats' it. Crass are no MORE punk than the Germs, or whoever, maybe less. I could care less, musical taste is pretty subjective, but Anarchists can't honestly claim any ownership of punk rock.
     
  14. NGNM85

    NGNM85Experienced Member Experienced member Forum Member


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    Sep 8, 2009
     
    I was going to let it go but this started bugging me, I was just going to amend my first post, but I can't find an "edit" feature. (If anybody knows how to do this I'd REALLY appreciate it.)

    Again, not a personal attack, and musical taste is a persons' business, you could rock out to Britney Spears for all I care.
    But of all the bands you could've gone after you choose THE CLASH?! Personally, I prefer the Pistols, even they produced very little material, and were much more limited musically, however...

    The Clash forfeited so much money to keep their record prices low, they didn't see any real profits until they'd been together for SIX YEARS! I've never heard of a band doing that. They also supported the Anti-Nazi league and played a ton of Rock Against Racism gigs. The Clash dedicated a triple album to the socialist rebels (And democratically elected leaders until Reagan overthrew them.) the Sandinistas showing solidarity with them. Thats' not even mentioning all the anti-authoritarian, anti-corporate songs they wrote, (Even "Rock the Casbah' was a political song.) "Straight to Hell", "Clampdown", "White Riot", "Hate and War", "Police and Theives", "English Civil War", "Career Opportunities", "Police on My Back", "Washington Bullets"....etc., etc. If anything they established a formula for Crass to follow. The Pistols or the Ramones you can argue about, but the Clash,..it's absurd.
     
  15. Extinction

    ExtinctionExperienced Member Experienced member Forum Member


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    Sep 1, 2009
     
    That is a good point, but everybody is entitled to their opinion. Personally my favorite 77 band was The Damned. People never talk about them enough. They also got me into goth rock. Very underrated.
     
  16. mel_the_bell

    mel_the_bellExperienced Member Experienced member


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    Aug 30, 2009
     
    i think my fave 70s "punk" band would have to be the ruts...think i enjoy listening to them the most tbh
     
  17. ungovernable

    ungovernableAutonome Staff Member Admin Team Experienced member


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    @NGNM85: Well i don't know much about The Clash, you seem to know it a lot better than me... I didn't know they did all this stuff, the band is better than i thought :p At least if we compare them to the Sex Pistols and Ramones, they are less stupid and more involved in activism...
     
  18. ghost in the void

    ghost in the voidExperienced Member Experienced member Forum Member


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    Aug 8, 2009
     
    i agree that THE CLASH are quite important. i don't think "gateway" major label bands should be completely dismissed by the underground. people can dis bands like them, BAD RELIGION, ANTI-FLAG, RANCID etc etc, but these bands offer a way for people to realize punk still exists, and on doing their research they can discover DIY and become involved.

    "rock the casbah" is one of my favourite songs. i found it on a jukebox in a tiny opal mining town when i lived in the desert, and i danced the night away drunk as a satyr. if punk had to be strictly underground all the time, i would indeed have to have been rocking out to ms spears instead.
     
  19. Spider

    SpiderExperienced Member Experienced member


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    Sep 3, 2009
     
    This is a really good point.

    I like to take it even further, being in a Pop-Punk band, I would say I'm probably producing the most entry-level punk music going around. Your average teenager who listens to Fall out boy can hear us and understand where we are going. By giving them this opening, we can hopefully start getting them to shows, and down the punk path. We've played shows with bands like Face-Eater, Collapsed, The Seduction... Heavy bands. People who came to see us were exposed to something completely foreign to them, I hope some of them decided to look further into it.

    A big moment for me in my discovery of Heavy punk/Hardcore was when I was 16 I went to a For Amusement Only Show (A Melbourne Pop-Punk Band at the time) and Mindsnare( Melbournes Gods of Hardcore) Played right after. They said there was another hardcore show at a house after the gig and i was so blown away by the intensity of it that i ended up going and that started me on the path that eventually led me to anarchism.

    Sorry to hijack thread I'm just really passionate about Punk at all levels being important for the survival of the scene.
     
  20. NGNM85

    NGNM85Experienced Member Experienced member Forum Member


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    Sep 8, 2009
     
    Actually, Anti-Flag have yet to put out a major label record. Their previous efforts (I HIGHLY recommend “Die For the Government” it’s AMAZING.) were on indie labels like their own AF Records, or Side One Dummy. Most of Bad Religion’s catalog is also distributed by indie labels, like Epitaph. The Offspring didn’t join the majors until "Americana",..which was also a great album, after releasing the self titled debut, "Ignition", their breakout album "Smash", and "Ixnay on the Hombre" all on indie labels. Rancid didn’t go major until the mediocre “Indestructible.” Rancid’s “Out Come the Wolves”, Offspring’s “Smash’, and Green Day’s “Dookie” (Their major label debut.) came out around the same time, (All fantastic albums, btw.) with "Smash" setting the record for biggest indie record of all time, nearly killing Epitaph with sales, but also propelling punk rock onto the mainstream radar. “The year punk broke.” What bothers me is that people can’t seem to distinguish between selling records, and selling out. This thing with the Clash was a perfect example. Just because a band is well-liked does not automatically make them industry prostitutes. Theres’ just this bogus reactive tendency in punk rock that if something outsells the Casualties latest it must be manufactured corporate crap.

    Back to 70’s punk…..
     
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